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Former NHL Player Konstantin Koltsov Died of 'Apparent Suicide' in Miami: Police

The 42-year-old had been dating tennis star Aryna Sabalenka since 2021

<p>Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios</p>

Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios

  • Konstantin Koltsov died by suicide, Miami-Dade Police confirm to PEOPLE

  • Police were dispatched early Monday morning to a Bal Harbour resort after a report that a male jumped from a balcony

  • The 42-year-old former NHL player had been dating world No. 2 tennis star Aryna Sabalenka since 2021

Konstantin Koltsov, the former NHL player and boyfriend of world No. 2 tennis star Aryna Sabalenka, died by suicide, the Miami-Dade Police Department has confirmed to PEOPLE.

“According to investigators on Monday, March 18, 2024, at approximately 12:39 a.m., Bal Harbour Police and Fire Rescue were dispatched to the St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort, 9703 Collins Avenue, in reference to a male that jumped from a balcony,” according to a statement from the Miami-Dade Police Department obtained by PEOPLE.

The statement continued, “The Miami-Dade Police Department, Homicide Bureau, responded and has taken over the investigation of the apparent suicide of Mr. Konstantin Koltsov. No foul play is suspected.”

Koltsov, who routinely traveled to Sabalenka’s tennis tournaments, was in Miami to support his girlfriend’s appearance in the Miami Open, which began on Sunday.

<p>Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios</p> Konstantin Koltsov

Bruce Bennett Studios via Getty Images Studios

Konstantin Koltsov

Related: Who Was Aryna Sabalenka's Boyfriend? What to Know About the Late Konstantin Koltsov

According to The Tennis Letter, the 25-year-old Belarusian star will stay in the tournament but will not be available to the media.

Koltsov and Sabalenka first started dating in 2021.

They went Instagram official with their relationship in June 2021, as Sabalenka shared a photo of Koltsov kissing her cheek. "It's good when there is someone who is able to understand my madness😅," she wrote in the caption. “But you won't get bored with me, right @koltsov2021 ? 🤣❤️."

Aryna Sabalenka Instagram
Aryna Sabalenka Instagram

The former Pittsburgh Penguins player’s death was first confirmed by the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) team, Salavat Yulaev Ufa, where he was part of the coaching staff.

"It is with deep sorrow that we inform you that Salavat Yulaev coach Konstantin Koltsov has passed away,"  the team said in a statement posted online.

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“He was a strong and cheerful person, he was loved and respected by players, colleagues, and fans. Konstantin Evgenievich forever wrote himself into the history of our club,” the statement continued, adding that "Koltsov won the Russian Championship and the Gagarin Cup as part of Salavat Yulaev, and did a great job on the team’s coaching staff."

The Penguins also acknowledged his death with a statement posted to social media. "The Penguins extended their deepest condolences to the family and friends of former Penguins forward, Konstantin Koltsov," they said.

Related: Konstantin Koltsov, Former Penguins Player and Boyfriend of Aryna Sabalenka, Dead at 42

Koltsov played professional ice hockey for 18 years, competing in the IIHF World Championships and the 2002 and 2010 Winter Olympic Games for Belarus.

Koltsov was first drafted into the NHL in 1999. He was part of the Pittsburgh Penguins for three seasons, from 2002 to 2006. He played 144 NHL games, according to the team.

He later played for the Kontinental Hockey League, from 2008 to 2016, before officially retiring from the sport in November 2016.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline by dialing 988, text "STRENGTH" to the Crisis Text Line at 741741 or go to 988lifeline.org.

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Read the original article on People.