Etihad Stadium to become Marvel Stadium

Aaron Bunch and Ben McKay

Melbourne's Etihad Stadium will be known as Marvel Stadium from September after venue owners agreed to a sponsorship with Walt Disney Company Australia.

The name change comes after an eight-year association with the Abu Dhabi-based airline.

The eight-year deal, to start on September 1, will include the renaming of the stadium, an on-site Marvel shop and cross-marketing by the entertainment giant.

Melbourne Stadiums Limited chief executive Michael Green says the sponsorship deal will allow for increased engagement with visitors to the ground.

"We have become the world's busiest multi-purpose stadium. Now, we look forward to a new era of entertainment for the stadium where we will push the envelope," he said in a statement on Thursday.

Green said Marvel was one of the world's most recognised brands and a "powerhouse" of the entertainment industry.

"It is a brand dedicated to audience experiences, which firmly aligns with our vision to create incredible experiences for fans," he said.

Walt Disney Company Australia managing director Kylie Watson-Wheeler said the sponsorship deal provided a new way for the Marvel brand to interact with a broad audience.

"Through (this) partnership with MSL we hope to bring people together and provide them with a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in the Marvel brand," Watson-Wheeler said.

The ground has been previously been named the Docklands stadium, Colonial Stadium and Telstra Dome.

Since 2016, the ground has been owned by the AFL, which plays around 45 matches a season there.

The outside-the-box name has risen many eyebrows, though it's far from the strangest stadium branding.

Sydney has Lottoland and Townsville hosts 1300SMILES Stadium, while the USA and UK host a string of ultra-corporate

That includes the KFC Yum! Centre, while the NBA Conference Finals are currently being played in venues including the Quicken Loans Arena and Oracle Arena.

The coach of one of Etihad Stadium's sporting tenants, North Melbourne's Brad Scott, said he didn't care what the Docklands venue was called - so long as there was a strong commercial return.

"I assume it's a pretty good deal for the AFL," he said.

"Those good deals flow through the game all the way to grassroots level.

"Any revenue that the game can bring in is a good thing for grassroots footy so they can call it what they like."