Emily Seebohm breaks down in beautiful scenes at Tokyo Olympics

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·Sports Reporter
·3-min read
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Emily Seebohm broke down soon after winning bronze in the 200m backstroke final, behind gold medal winning teammate Kaylee McKeown.
Emily Seebohm was overcome by emotion when interviewed after her impressive bronze medal result in the 200m backstroke final at the Tokyo Olympics. Pictures: Channel 7

Australian swimmer Emily Seebohm put her emotions on display after claiming an impressive bronze medal finish in the 200m backstroke.

Teammate Kaylee McKeown made it another golden day in the pool for Australia, finishing first head of silver medallist, Canada's Kylie Masse.

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Speaking to Channel 7 poolside soon after the race, Seebohm broke down in appreciation of the opportunity she had at this Olympics.

In a further beautiful scene in the medal ceremony, McKeown invited Seebohm to share the top step of the podium while the Australian anthem was played.

Seebohm was clearly overwhelmed by emotions following her stunning performance alongside McKeown, 13 years after her first Olympic medal and nine years after her last medal in an individual event.

"I'm sorry, it's just so amazing, I never thought this was going to happen again," she said.

"I'm so proud, the team has done so well and it has been like an absolute dream.

"I'm just so grateful for all the times I've been on the Australian swim team, honestly it has been the favourite thing of my entire career being on this team." 

The 29-year-old is now a six-time Olympic medallist, having first competed at the Olympics in Beijing in 2008.

With the Tokyo Olympics likely to be her last appearance at the Games, Seebohm undoubtedly finished on a high note.

Swimming fans on social media were blown away by the emotional interview.

Kaylee McKeown, Emily Seebohm win medals in 200m backstroke

McKeown is just the seventh woman in history to complete the 100m-200m backstroke double at an Olympic Games.

It marked the seventh gold medal for Australia in the pool in Tokyo, putting the swim team on the cusp of equalling Australia's most successful Olympics - the eight golds won at the 1956 Melbourne Games.

It was Australia's 10th gold medal overall in Tokyo.

McKeown lurked behind Canadian Kyle Masse for the initial three laps.

The Aussie was 0.80 seconds behind at the halfway stage and then turned for the last lap 0.69 seconds shy of Masse.

But the Australian timed her surge to perfection, reeling in Masse over the final 15 metres.

McKeown won in two minutes 04.68 seconds from Masse (2:05.42) .

And Seebohm, at her fourth Olympics, clocked 2:06.17 to add a cherished bronze to her two silver career medals.

Earlier in the day, Ariarne Titmus took silver in the 800m final for her fourth medal of the Games.

American champion Katie Ledecky got revenge on Saturday after Titmus win the 200m and 400m golds.

Titmus' silver medal comes after her twin golds and bronze in the 4x200m freestyle relay.

The Australian could also add another in the 4x100 medley relay final on Sunday.

Watch 'Mind Games', the new series from Yahoo Sport Australia exploring the often brutal mental toil elite athletes go through in pursuit of greatness:

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