Day-night Tests a real challenge: Smith

Steve Larkin
Australian batsman Steve Smith insists strategy and discipline are keys to pink-ball Test cricket

Steve Smith reckons strategy and discipline are keys to conquering a pink ball in Test cricket.

Pink balls will be used in the second Test against Pakistan in Adelaide starting on Friday - Australia's fifth day-night Test match.

The Australians have won all five day-night Tests - three in Adelaide and two in Brisbane.

But Smith says a different approach is needed when batting against pink balls.

"I find the ball harder to see during the day," Smith told reporters on Tuesday.

"It's easier to see at the night but it does (move) more, so that kind of cancels itself out in a way."

Smith has four scores of 40 or more, but none higher than 59, in the three day-night Tests in Adelaide.

"It's a bit different. As a captain in particular, you have got to have different strategies in place," he said.

"Sometimes it can be really difficult to bat at night.

"During the day if the ball gets a bit soft it can be hard to take wickets.

"And as a batter as well now, it's about if you get in when the ball is soft it's cashing in; if it's hard and the ball is swinging and seaming around it's about being really disciplined for those times.

"But also just knowing the tempos of the game to play with the pink ball.

"We have played a few games now and sort of understand in a way how the ball responds, particularly this surface out here (in Adelaide)."

The day-night Test in Adelaide is certain to eclipse the disappointing crowd aggregate of 45,891 for the first Test in Brisbane.

"They're really good spectacles," Smith said of day-night Tests.

"I have been lucky to be involved in a few here (in Adelaide) and the crowds are always really good, the atmosphere is always amazing.

"Day-night Test cricket is a great advertisement for the game and it will be cool to be involved in another one."