Cycling coach gets all-clear after surgery

Roger Vaughan

Australian cycling coach Tim Decker has received a clean bill of health ahead of the world championships and Olympics after brain surgery.

The track endurance coach had a scan last Wednesday and his neurosurgeon reported the good news that his brain bleed has stopped.

Decker needed surgery on November 25 after hitting his head in a cycling crash.

That happened nearly five years after Decker needed surgery for a brain bleed, also after a bike crash.

"There's no residual fluid - and there's something in there as well," he joked about the scan results.

"I'm feeling a lot of relief, for sure.

"I was pretty positive I knew what was coming but you just don't know - every little thing, you think does that mean something is wrong."

While Decker cannot ride a bike or drive a car for several more weeks, he can fly with the track team to the February 26-March 2 world championships in Berlin.

The worlds are an important milestone for the Australian track squad ahead of the Tokyo Olympics.

Decker coaches several of Australia's top Olympic medal chances in track cycling, including the world-champion men's and women's team pursuit squads.

He will have to manage his workload, with fatigue the biggest issue for him in the wake of the health scare but otherwise he can now focus fully again on the track endurance squad's Olympic preparations.

"Now I can breathe a sigh of relief. If I feel a bit off, it doesn't mean something's wrong," he said.

Decker added that having been through similar surgery before, he has an idea of how to manage his return to full-time work.

Ahead of the medical all-clear, Decker had kept in touch with his riders and other staff at the Adelaide track headquarters.

"Now I just have to watch the way I work," he said.

"But life isn't perfect, it doesn't wait for anybody."