What shaped Paine's leadership approach

Tim Paine has kept a file of various inspirational acts or words from cricket coaches and captains to have piqued his interest.

Paine was planning to use the various titbits in a coaching career when he retired, something that almost happened a year ago after a frustrating Sheffield Shield season in which he struggled to get a game for Tasmania.

Now it will form part of his approach as the nation's 46th Test captain, a role Paine was given after Steve Smith and David Warner's sacking over the Cape Town cheating scandal.

"I've always thought about going into coaching or something like that after cricket," Paine told reporters in Johannesburg.

"So I've constantly sort of written things down that I've liked about coaches and other leaders that I've played under.

"I suppose to try to take bits that I like and mould it to something that fits me."

Paine is reluctant to talk too much about his future as Test skipper, having pointed out before the fourth Test that a new coach could want a new captain.

However, Cricket Australia board member Mark Taylor has indicated Paine was is no stop-gap measure.

Paine became the second Tasmanian to captain Australia's Test team, following in the footsteps of Ricky Ponting, while he is the fourth keeper to have the honour.

The 33-year-old, who played much of the fourth Test with a broken thumb, is confident he can juggle leading, batting and keeping.

"I can, no doubt. Batting down the order as well, I've got a lot of time to sit and think," he said.

"The way I play my cricket now is a lot more relaxed than when I last played for Australia. I was quite an uptight, aggressive type of cricketer.

"Now I'm a lot more laid-back, which allows me to conserve mental energy.

"I was speaking to Boof (outgoing coach Darren Lehmann) after keeping 100 plus overs in both innings and (told him) I felt really fresh, so that's a good sign.

"The whole week has been a bit of a whirlwind to be honest. I think it (captaincy) is a role I could potentially grow into down the track."

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