Kiwis have to be 'spot on' to stop 'pretty special' Aussie batsman

New Zealand quick Trent Boult was forced to watch from the sidelines as Australia’s newest batting star Marnus Labuschagne effectively took the first Test away from his side.

Unfortunately for the Black Caps, Boult’s stint on the sidelines hasn't provided him with any insight on how to stop the 25-year-old batsman.

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Labuschagne continued his red-hot summer with a first-innings century and a second-innings 50 as the home team romped to a 296-run win over the Kiwis in Perth.

Boult, missing the Test due to a side strain, is set to return to the Kiwis' attack for the Boxing Day Test at the MCG.

Trent Boult's return is likely to provide a major boost for the Kiwis. Pic: Getty

The Optus Stadium clash was New Zealand's first sighting of the 25-year-old Labuschagne and Boult admitted there were no apparent weaknesses in the Queenslander's game.

Good old fashioned patience and consistency will be the weapons the left-armer will use if he's cleared to take on Australia from December 26.

"Obviously, he's got some pretty special numbers behind him from a dozen or so Test matches," Boult said.

"Basically, I think the same rules apply to a lot of batsmen. If you can kind of be patient and outlast them and try to put some pressure on them to draw the error, then that would be the starting point.

"He looks a pretty classy player and, obviously, looks like a good wicket which we're going to have to be spot on with our areas."

The 30-year-old was intrigued to watch as his New Zealand colleagues peppered the Australian batsmen with a barrage of short-pitched bowling in the second innings in Perth.

New Zealand admit there are few weaknesses in Marnus Labuschagne's game. Pic: Getty

All of Australia's top six fell to short balls in the second dig, including Labuschagne, but Boult didn't see any issue with continuing the tactic in Melbourne.

"It's just hard Test cricket is what I'd put it down to," he said.

"At both ends, it's a way of intimidating and trying to get up in the batsmen and it worked very well for them.

"I've read a little bit that there will be a bit more this series, so it'll be exciting to see."