Crawford soon to be world famous: trainer

Vince Rugari
Terence Crawford is set for global superstardom once he beats Jeff Horn, according to his trainer

Terence Crawford might not be well known outside of US boxing circles just yet, but a win over Jeff Horn will put him on course for global superstardom.

That's the view of his trainer, Brian McIntyre, who reckons his charge is bound for Floyd Mayweather levels of fame.

Two of the most powerful organisations in US sport - ESPN and Top Rank - are banking on Crawford to beat Horn on Saturday, claim the WBO welterweight championship and become one of the faces of boxing in America.

Mayweather has previously anointed Crawford as his successor, rating him as the world's top pound-for-pound fighter and saying he reminded him of himself when he was younger - but the 30-year-old from Nebraska has a long way to go to match his public profile.

Crawford's fanbase isn't anywhere near where it should be considering what he has achieved, having won titles in two weight classes and unified the four major junior welterweight belts last year.

He received only a muted response from the small crowd assembled at MGM Grand for his open workout. Horn, surprisingly, had arguably more support for his.

Horn's promoter Dean Lonergan has repeatedly put that on McIntyre, blaming his poor management decisions for Crawford's lack of crossover appeal and describing him as "worst-managed, worst-advised fighter in the history of boxing."

But according to McIntyre, it's only a matter of time until Crawford's name is everywhere.

"It's already started since just getting on the scene and he's been climbing since then," said McIntyre.

"I see it getting much bigger after this and with the push of ESPN and Top Rank, it's going to get much bigger.

"But first we have to get past Jeff Horn.

"He's a determined fighter and has the will to win."

Crawford started boxing at just seven and, about five years later, McIntyre said he could see something special in him.

"When he was about 12 or 13, he never lost after that," he said.

"He was going up against guys that were No.1 and 2 in the country and he had only had about 10 or 11 fights. And he was beating them. And I was like 'wow, this kid is bad'."