'Cool' Khawaja will let runs do talking

Murray Wenzel
Usman Khawaja has rejected suggestions he no longer has the desire to represent Australia

Usman Khawaja has rejected Shane Warne's fears he's lost the desire to play Test cricket, saying you "either get it or you don't" when it comes to his on-field demeanour.

Khawaja, dropped midway through the Ashes, was the big omission from the squad to play Pakistan at home this summer.

Warne declared last week that he "just wants to shake him and get him to show a bit more" and that it was time for him to show how much he wanted to play for Australia.

Preparing to captain Queensland in Tuesday's one-day domestic final, Khawaja wasn't in the mood to entertain Warne's insinuations.

"I don't think there's any need to answer that question," he said.

"I'm a pretty cool bloke. You either get it or you don't, that's the way it is.

"No, never (have I stopped wanting to play for Australia), if I had I would've retired.

"I feel like I belong at international level, but I've got to score runs."

Khawaja averages 40.66 in 44 Tests but that lifts to 52.97 at home and coach Justin Langer insists he'll remain in the mix if he puts runs on the board.

The coach even indicated last week that Khawaja, almost 33, was better off playing for Queensland than remaining with the squad at the Gabba as the spare batsman.

Bulls skipper Khawaja said had learnt to ignore the outside noise.

"I'm a batsman, run-scorer first and foremost so that's my currency," he said.

"You look at my Shield record, one day domestic record, BBL record.

"I score runs, that's all that matters."

The usually fluent strokemaker dug in for an unbeaten 86 against Tasmania to ensure the Bulls secured home advantage for the final in his one and only innings since missing Test selection.

Queensland coach Wade Seccombe rated it a "special knock" in tough conditions and labelled criticism of Khawaja's desire as unfair.

And footage of a shattered Khawaja in the dressing rooms following Australia's gutting Headingley Ashes loss - released on Monday ahead of a documentary series to come next year - also revealed plenty.

"Yeah it was very tough moment, I think it was a tough moment for the whole of Australia, let alone the guys playing," Khawaja said.

"That stuff's the down of sport, the stuff you don't see, I keep my emotions in check when I'm on the field, but it's probably the stuff off the field that you don't see."