Burke calls on spirit of '16 from Bulldogs

Coach Nathan Burke is calling for the spirit of 2016 in the Western Bulldogs' AFLW finals series and says he "detests" any suggestion this year is about experience for his young team.

The Bulldogs will play Collingwood in an elimination final on Sunday at Victoria Park.

It is their first final since the Bulldogs' 2018 premiership, which was also the last year they beat the Magpies.

But Burke is calling on the Bulldogs to aim high and emulate their AFL brothers, who made history by coming from an elimination final to win the 2016 premiership.

"One of the things we need to realise is that 2018 was five seasons ago and probably when those players were in that (grand final) I doubt if any of them thought, 'It's going to be five seasons before we get another crack at a final'," Burke said.

"There are no guarantees that next year we'll be back.

"I really detest any talk of 'this will be good experience'. We're not after experience here, it's bloody hard getting to finals.

"When you're in them, get on a roll and try and win it. That's our mindset. Collingwood are step one."

No one knows this better than Burke, who played in only eight finals - including the 1997 grand final loss - during his storied 323 games at St Kilda.

His career included one of the most iconic moments in AFL history, when teammate Nicky Winmar raised his jumper in defiance of racist Collingwood fans after St Kilda's win at Victoria Park in 1993.

Burke points out that no players he coaches were born when that famous flashpoint took place.

"I get more flashbacks (about) the old ladies hanging over the fence, swearing at you and trying to hit you with their umbrellas," he said of Collingwood's notorious old AFL home ground.

"That's my lasting memory of Victoria Park, spitting on you as you're going up the race.

"It was a monumental game (in 1993) ... the repercussions of that line-in-the-sand moment - the whole of society has benefited from that example."

It will be the 50th game for Bulldogs player Naomi Ferres, who was born in Melbourne's western suburbs and has played all her football for teams in the area.

Burke lauds her as "the epitome of a daughter of the west".

Another key player will be ruck Alice Edmonds, who is in career-best form.

Asked what will happen if Edmonds does not receive All-Australian honours, Burke replied "there will be hell to pay".