AFL's hub clubs praised by players' chief

Steve Larkin

AFL Players Association chief Paul Marsh says it would be easy for players from the four hub clubs to spit the dummy.

But Marsh says West Coast, Fremantle, Adelaide and Port Adelaide players are embracing being put in quarantine hubs to allow the AFL to restart on June 11.

The four clubs will be based in hubs on the Gold Coast to allow the season resumption.

"They have been incredibly resilient on this issue and they have moved straight to the positives of 'okay we're going to get on with this'," Marsh told reporters on Friday.

"And they don't have a lot of choice at the moment.

"You can whinge and spit the dummy or you can get on with it ... they're getting on with it and they're going to make the best of it, so it's a credit to them."

The Eagles, Dockers, Crows and Power will stay at two Gold Coast resorts.

They will likely be fixtured to play each other, and the two Queensland clubs - Brisbane and Gold Coast - in the initial batch of games.

The AFL will allow, and pay for, families of players to stay at the hubs.

But Adelaide's chief executive Andrew Fagan said families of Crows players won't initially enter the hubs.

While West Coast and Fremantle won't have to enter their hubs until the season resumes, the Crows and Port will shift to the Gold Coast by May 25 - the date when contact training is permitted.

Under SA laws, contact training is banned until June 8, meaning the SA clubs must move interstate sooner, while WA has no such restriction.

Fagan said the Crows would delay their departure from Adelaide until probably May 24.

"There is a fair bit of planning that needs to take place between now and then," Fagan told reporters on Friday.

"We also need to recognise that the playing group is going to be away from families, so we want to limit the amount of time we're up there.

"They (players) will get up there around the 25th, they will train as a group and in doing so get a bit of a feel of what it's like.

"Once they do that, they'll be able to have more informed conversations with their families about whether it's good for them to come up."