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People Are Sharing "Facts" From School That Were Proven Wrong, And You Might Want To Take A Look At These

Listen, we all can probably name a thing or two that we learned growing up that was no longer relevant or had been totally disproven by the time we became adults.

Students in a classroom
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Reddit user u/yepvaishz recently asked people, "What was a fact taught to you in school that ended up being disproven during your lifetime?" I personally saw a few of mine in the thread — maybe you will, too:

1. "The food pyramid."

—u/OutrageousEvent

"It was all a scam from Big Grain."

—u/kumakami89

2. "When I was a kid, the Giant Squid had never been captured or photographed, and some people talked about it like it was el chupacabra. My little brother always said he'd be the first person to get footage of one. Sadly, it has since become an ordinary animal that we know exists. RIP the Kraken."

—u/EarthExile

3. "Cracking your knuckles causes arthritis."

—u/panda388

Someone cracking their knuckles
Tharakorn / Getty Images/iStockphoto

4. "From an educational filmstrip: 'Saturn has four beautiful rings.' The Voyager photos of the thousands of rings had come in, like, a week before we watched this."

—u/robaato72

5. "I had a teacher in fourth grade that would force left-handed kids to write with their right hand. She said that it was the normal way to write and would benefit them later in life. (Circa 1974.)"

—u/TrailerParkPrepper

6. "Your tongue has different areas for tasting different tastes: sweet on the tip, sour on the sides, bitter on the back, etc. I feel like this was some elaborate prank played on my generation. But I remember seeing this in my elementary school biology textbook. I don’t even think it was disproven. Like, they just stopped telling this lie. WTF."

—u/danneedsahobby

Someone sticking their tongue out
Olga Shefer / Getty Images

7. "Germany would never reunite. The French would never allow it."

—u/Powerful-Ad9392

8. "'You won't always have a calculator in your pocket!'"

—u/Plus-Statistician80

9. "In a late '90s computer class, it was, 'We’ll never have terabyte hard drives in our lifetime, or a need for that much data.' Heh, now you can get terabyte Micro SD cards. Wild."

—u/abidingyawn

An older computer
Imaginima / Getty Images/iStockphoto

10. "Pompeii was buried slowly by falling ash. They pointed out that remnants of people were found right in the middle of doing things but didn't realize this contradicted the burying being slow. It's now thought that it was buried very quickly by pyroclastic flows — instead of superheated gas traveling over 200mph."

—u/ablativeyoyo

11. "Blood is blue until exposed to oxygen."

—u/mwjb86SFW

12. "That you’re gonna end up working a minimum wage job if you don’t go to college."

—u/Johnny_Menace

A man talking on his phone while holding a thermos of coffee
Fg Trade Latin / Getty Images

13. "Playing with computers is a waste of time and won’t lead to a career. This was said to me by a very old and bitter teacher. Twenty-five years in IT and counting."

—u/zerbey

14. "Glass is actually a liquid, which is why old windows look droopy. I was definitely in my 20s before I learned that wasn't true."

—u/Try2Relax

15. "That Christopher Columbus was a great guy, and all the Natives rose up in celebration when he came. Yeah, I don't teach history that way."

—u/Soundwave-1976

A woman with her hand out and a "duh" face
Deepak Sethi / Getty Images

16. "I was always taught Mississippi's secession from the union in the Civil War was to preserve the state's right to be independent and had nothing at all to do with slavery. That Confederate heritage was about family and not racism. Slavery is mentioned in the very first sentence of the first paragraph of the letter of secession as the primary reason. They decided if they couldn't own humans anymore, it would crash the economy."

—u/pontiacfirebird92

17. "So many, but I’ll start with cold-blooded dinosaurs. I was in college when opinions about them changed."

—u/LifeHappenzEvryMomnt

18. "That people only use 10% of their brains. I mean, some do, but that’s not normal."

—u/Constek

19. "That microwaves kill all the nutrients in food."

—u/Amazing-Treat-4388

Someone putting food into a microwave
Siarhei Khaletski / Getty Images

20. "Hard work will be noticed and rewarded."

—u/RedSpartan3227

21. "My history teacher taught us Italy is in Africa."

—u/thisBarbieisJewish

22. "Ain’t isn’t a word."

—u/Negative-Low-1997

23. "RIP ninth planet, [Pluto]."

—u/MHipDogg

Have something else to add? Tell me down in the comments below!

These entries were edited for length and clarity.