Peter Norman may receive apology

Blacklisted for his involvement in the Black Power protest at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, the late Australian sprinter Peter Norman may receive an apology from the Australian parliament.

Norman won silver in the 200m sprint in Mexico City, still an Australian record, but he will be better remembered for standing alongside gold medallist Tommie Smith and bronze medallist John Carlos wearing the Olympic Project for Human Rights badge while they gave a Black Power salute.

The sprinter was punished for his involvement and blacklisted for the 1972 Munich Games, despite qualifying. He quit athletics in protest.

Norman died in 2006 with Smith and Carlos giving eulogies at his funeral.

On Monday, parliament will debate Labor MP Andrew Leigh's motion to apologise to Norman.

Dr Leigh, the member for the Canberra seat of Fraser, wants parliament to recognise Norman's extraordinary athletic achievements and bravery and apologise to him for not sending him to Munich. He will also move that the House of Representatives "belatedly recognises the powerful role that Peter Norman played in furthering racial equality".

Norman's daughter said she had tears in her eyes when she heard about the proposed apology.

"Words can't really express the pride and emotion that comes with reading your compassionate words," Emma Norman wrote on Dr Leigh's parliamentary website.

"On behalf of the Norman family and of course our dad, thank you, thank you very much."

Norman's mother said she was so proud of the stand her son took that day.

"The Olympic Games always have special memories for us, I'm glad that he may be recognised at last for Peter's commitment to sport here in Australia," Thelma Norman wrote on the website.

Thelma Norman, who is 91, and her daughter Elaine Ambler are flying to Canberra to see the matter being debated during question time.

Dr Leigh said it was an important Australian story.

"I wish more kids knew about it," he told AAP on Sunday.

"It's funny, so many more people know that story about Dawn Fraser stealing a flag than they do about Peter Norman taking a stand for civil rights."